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FAT JELLY CADDIS & MICRO JELLY CADDIS



Under water and against an overcast sky


Caddisfly larvae comprise the staple diet of trout and grayling in many rivers around the world. Free living caddis larvae, size 14 and smaller, are frequently strongly translucent. While stout net-spinning caddis larvae are a little less translucent than their free-living cousins, an illusion of translucency is created by the furry gills protruding along the length of each flank.

Stretch Cord with a diameter of 0.8-1.0mm is easy to use and produces abdominal segmentation well suited to larger grubby organisms like medium-sized caddisfly larvae. Due to the elastic nature of Stretch Cord it is possible to achieve an accurate taper and range of segment and abdominal thickness, by simply adjusting the tension when wrapping the abdomen. Trimming the tag end at the hook bend at an angle causes it to light up under water, imitating the tail tuft of net-spinning caddisfly larvae. This pattern can be tied on a size 16 hook using 0.7mm stretch cord and a 2mm bead. The Fat Jelly Caddis is effective in both natural and attractor colours.

The Micro Jelly Caddis is basically a smaller version of the Fat Jelly Caddis, tied on a size 16 hook using two strands of 0.5-0.6mm Stretch Cord. A thicker abdomen is achieved using two strands than is possible with a single one. I tie two versions: a light coloured one using two strands of light green stretch cord over an olive thread base, and a darker version constructed with one strand of light green and one strand of brown over black thread. 


FAT JELLY CADDIS TYING SEQUENCE

 

Step 1

Slip the bead onto the hook and then place the hook in the vice. Attach the thread to the bend of the hook, using as much torque as is possible without breaking the thread. Spin the thread anti-clockwise to reduce the diameter and tie in the single strand of 0.8-1.0mm Stretch Cord at the hook bend with three tight turns of thread, atop one another. Make two more turns immediately in front of the tie-in, followed by an additional two wraps over the original turns (this locks and prevents the strands spinning round shank when wrapping). Make two more turns in front of the tie-in and spin the thread clockwise to flatten it.

 

Step 2

Now advance the thread in closed turns to a position just behind the bead, ensuring that the shank is covered by a thin thread layer (without building bulk).

 

Step 3

Next stretch the strand of cord as much as possible and wrap it forward and around the shank. Pinching the tag end between the thumb and index finger of the left hand while at the same time pressing the tip of the index finger firmly against the tie-in on the far side of the hook bend, will help to prevent the tie-in spinning around the hook when making the first high-torque turn. Begin reducing the tension on the cord after the first or second turn to create a taper (practice this a few times until you get the hang of it). Tie off the Stretch Cord just behind the bead, stretching the excess before trimming it away close to the thread wraps.

 

Step 4

Spin a thin noodle of dubbing onto the thread and build a thorax before tying off with two half hitches. Varnish the 1cm of thread closest to the bead before making the second hitch. Attempting to varnish the completed tie off can result in a matted thorax and the removal of black paint from the bead. Next trim the excess Stretch Cord at the hook bend at a downward angle, leaving a tag of two or three millimetres. Finally place a drop of varnish on the thread wraps at the hook bend.

 

When tying the brown version of the Fat Jelly Caddis spiral the thread forward in open turns exposing as much as the hook shank as possible. This will allow the shinny hook to produce some subtle sparkle.

 


FAT JELLY CADDIS RECIPES

Green               Lime Green
 

ORIGINATOR:  Marc Griffiths
HOOK:  TMC 2457 size 14
HEAD:  2.0 mm copper tungsten bead
THREAD: 140 denier, green
ABDOMEN:  Single strand 0.8-1.0 mm green Stretch Cord
THORAX:  Natural Hare’s Ear dubbing
Note:  The dark green FJC imitates free-living caddis larvae (Hydrobiosidae). As the naturals are more slender than net-spinners I keep the abdomen of the dark green version slim, and use a smaller bead.

 

 

ORIGINATOR: Marc Griffiths
HOOK: TMC 2457 size 14
HEAD: 2.3-2.5mm black tungsten bead
THREAD: 140 denier, olive
ABDOMEN: Single strand light green (lime) 0.8-1.0 mm Stretch Cord
THORAX: Dark olive squirrel dubbing
Note: The light green FJC is intended to imitate net-spinning caddis larvae. Trimming the longish tag end at the hook bend at an angle causes it to light up under water, imitating the tail tuft of net-spinning caddisfly larvae.

 

 

Brown Purple
 

ORIGINATOR:  Marc Griffiths
HOOK:  TMC 2457 size 14
HEAD:   2.5 mm copper tungsten bead
THREAD:  140 denier, black
ABDOMEN:  Single strand 0.8-1.0 mm brown Stretch Cord
THORAX:  Brown Squirrel dubbing
LEGS (OPTIONAL):  Black Accent Flash
Note: a comparatively large thorax on the brown version is used to imitate medium stonefly or large mayfly nymphs. Eyes are added with permanent marker and then coated with Super Glue for permanence 


 

ORIGINATOR: Marc Griffiths
HOOK: TMC 2457 size 14
HEAD: 2.5 mm black nickel or black tungsten bead
THREAD: 140 denier, black
ABDOMEN: Single strand 0.8-1.0 mm purple Stretch Cord
THORAX: Black squirrel dubbing
LEGS (OPTIONAL): Black Accent Flash
Note: Purple is found at the high energy end of the colour spectrum, and is therefore the most visible colour in low light conditions and also at depth. It can be deadly on both rainbow and brown trout.

 

 

 

 

ORIGINATOR: Marc Griffiths
HOOK: TMC 2457 size 14
HEAD: 2.5 mm black tungsten bead
THREAD: 140 denier, tan or white
ABDOMEN: Single strand 0.8-1.0 mm pink Stretch Cord
THORAX: Black squirrel or natural hare’s ear dubbing
Note: This pattern was designed with Tongariro rainbows in mind.

MICRO JELLY CADDIS TYING SEQUENCE

 

Step 1

Tie the two strands of Stretch Cord in at the bend using the method described under Step 1 of the Fat Jelly Caddis sequence.

 

Step 2

Cover the hook shank in thread and using the method described under Step 3 of the Fat Jelly Caddis sequence, wrap the two strands together forward and around the shank, reducing tension to produce a taper. Tie off behind the bead and trim away the excess Stretch Cord one strand at a time, stretching each as much as possible when doing so.

 

Step 3

Dub the thorax and tie off using the method described for the Fat Jelly Caddis. Trim the excess Stretch Cord at the hook bend at oblique inward angles so that two small tags of 1-2mm remain. Remember to varnish the thread wraps at the bend.

 

MICRO JELLY CADDIS RECIPES

Lime Green               Green & Brown
 

ORIGINATOR:  Marc Griffiths
HOOK:  TMC 2457 size 16
THREAD:  70 denier, dark olive
HEAD:  2.0 mm black tungsten bead
ABDOMEN:  Two strands of light green or lime 0.5-0.6 mm Stretch Cord
THORAX:  Olive Hare's ear dubbing

 

ORIGINATOR:  Marc Griffiths
HOOK:  Light wire grub hook size 18-16
THREAD:  70 denier, black
HEAD:  2.0 mm black tungsten bead
ABDOMEN:  Two strands of 0.5-0.6 mm Stretch Cord; one green and one brown
THORAX:  Olive Hare's ear dubbing

 


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