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Olive Jelly Grub  Originator : Marc Griffiths | Size: 16 & 18

Willow Grubs are larvae of the willow gall sawfly, Pontania proxima. Many lose their footing during feeding forays in summer and fall into the water. Trout inhabiting lowland streams and rivers have learnt to take advantage of this seasonal food source. Lining up under the willows they either rise to take the little grubs in the surface film, or are content to feast on those that have sunk. Fish rising below willows in summer with no evidence of a hatch is good indication that they are eating floating grubs.

The Jelly Grub is about as realistic as you can get. It captures perfectly the yellow/green translucency and darker alimentary canal of the natural. It also makes a fairly good micro-caddis or olive midge larva imitation for finicky fish in the likes of spring creeks. It becomes lighter in colour, taking on an attractive yellow glow, once it is submerged.


 

 


Fishing Tip:  Fish feeding on willow grubs are notoriously difficult to catch; long leaders and ultra fine tippets being the order of the day. 

Suspend a Jelly Grub an inch or so below a dry fly, when the fish are rising to floating grubs.  In situations where visible trout are taking grubs below the surface, do not use an indicator.  Try to achieve a drag free drift that will place the imitation on the nose of a sited fish.  Strike when you see the flash of white of the fish's mouth opening and closing. 

 
 
 

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MARC GRIFFITHS   2007-16